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  •   Bethel University is proud to present an evening with legendary Basketball Coach and ESPN Analyst Bobby Knight Friday, April 19 at 7 p.m. in the Rosemary and Harry Crisp II Arena on the campus of Bethel University. Tickets go on sale this Thursday, Feb. 14. Knight currently serves as a basketball analyst for ESPN. He retired as the winningest coach in NCAA history with 902 wins-mostly coming at Indiana University and Texas Tech University. He also coached at West Point. While at Indiana, Knight led his teams to three NCAA championships, one National Invitation Tournament (NIT) championship, and 11 Big Ten Conference championships. He received the National Coach of the Year honor four times and the Big Ten Coach of the Year honor eight times. In 1984, he coached the USA men's Olympic team to a gold medal, becoming one of only three basketball coaches to win an NCAA title, NIT title, and an Olympic gold medal. Coach Knight was one of college basketball's most successful and innovative coaches, having perfected and popularized the motion offense. He has also been praised for running clean programs (none of his teams were ever sanctioned by the NCAA for recruiting violations) and graduating most of his players. The event will serve as an athletic fundraising event for Bethel's 30 athletic programs. This past year, Bethel University provided over 800 students an opportunity to earn a top notch college education as a student athlete. Tickets will go on sale this Thursday at Bethel's home basketball game against Freed-Hardeman University. Beginning February 15 tickets can be purchased in the Bethel University Bookstore, via phone at (731) 352-6445 or at remaining Bethel home basketball games. Fans can pay by cash or check. Most credit cards will also be accepted. Ticket prices include: Table of Ten-$1250, Floor seats-$125(includes seat at table with meal), Chairback Seats-$20, Bleacher Seats-$10, Student Bleacher-$5 All seating is reserved seating. For corporate sponsorships call Myra Carlock at (731) 352-4090, or Brad Chappell at (731) 352-6432.  
  •   Bethel University’s Academic Theatre will present “Lost in Yonkers,” an award-winning dramatic comedy by Neil Simon, Feb. 21-24 in Bouldin Auditorium at the school’s Dickey Fine Arts Building.       “Lost in Yonkers” is set in 1942 in the Bronx. Evelyn Kurnitz has just passed away following a lengthy illness. Her husband, Eddie Kurnitz, needs to take a job as a traveling salesman to pay off the medical bills incurred, and decides to ask his stern and straight talking mother, from who he is slightly estranged, if his two early-teen sons, Jay and Arty (who their Grandma call by their full given names, Yakob and Arthur), can live with her and their Aunt Bella Kurnitz in Yonkers. She reluctantly agrees after a threat by Bella. Despite their Grandma owning and operating a candy store, Jay and Arty don't like their new living situation as they're afraid of their Grandma, and find it difficult to relate to their crazy Aunt Bella, whose slow mental state is manifested by perpetual excitability and a short attention span, which outwardly comes across as a childlike demeanor. Into their collective lives returns one of Eddie and Bella's other siblings, Louie Kurnitz, a henchman for some gangsters. He is hiding out from Hollywood Harry, who wants what Louie stole and is hiding in his small black bag. Jay and Arty's mission becomes how to make money fast so that they can help their father and move back in together. Getting that money may entail stealing the $15,000 their Grandma has hidden somewhere. Bella's mission is to find a way to tell the family that she wants to get married to Johnny, her equally slow movie theater usher boyfriend, the two who could also use $5,000 of her mother's money to open their dream restaurant. And Louie's mission is to survive the next couple of days.      “Lost in Yonkers” is directed by Marion Graham, and show dates and times are as follows: Thursday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, Feb. 22 at 8 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Feb. 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets are available at the door prior to each performance with Bethel students, staff, and faculty admitted at no charge. Non-Bethel students and Senior Citizens are $5 each. All others are admitted for $7.      “Lost in Yonkers” is rated PG-13 due to some mature themes.
  •       On Feb. 22-23, 2013, Bethel University will celebrate a momentous occasion when its Hendrix Scholarship Competition celebrates its 25th anniversary. The Hendrix Scholarship is the school’s most prestigious scholarship with the annual winner earning full tuition, room and board. The runner up each year earns full tuition at Bethel.      The Hendrix Scholarship Competition was established in 1988 by Mr. Willard R. Hendrix of Nashville, Tenn. Hendrix was a successful Nashville civic leader and businessman who had a great desire to bring qualified and dedicated faculty into contact with outstanding and deserving students. The establishment of the Hendrix Endowment Trust and the Hendrix Scholarship Competition are the fulfillment of one of Mr. Hendrix’s dreams. As the grandson of Bethel University President W.W. Hendrix, the younger Hendrix wanted to pay tribute to his grandfather, who had reopened Bethel University on a new McKenzie campus after its devastating hit during the Civil War.      Twenty-five years after its inception, the Hendrix competition continues to give deserving students scholarship money.      Student C.J. Cassell of Nashville said the scholarship money is just part of the benefit of being a Hendrix Scholarship recipient.      “The friends I met at the Hendrix competition have been the most supportive, studious friends I’ve met on campus,” Cassell said. “They are majorly responsible for my current and continued academic success.”          “We always look forward to the Hendrix Scholarship Competition,” said Tina Hodges, Dean of Enrollment Services for the College of Liberal Arts. “It brings some of the best and brightest students to our campus, and they get to not only compete in the competition, but they get a real feel of our very special Bethel atmosphere.”      The Hendrix Scholarship Competition is a two-day event geared toward traditional undergraduate students who are invited to compete in both an academic examination and in an interview process.      Hodges said to be considered for the Hendrix Competition, a student must be a high school senior with at least a 3.25 GPA and a 24/1090 or above ACT/SAT score.         Those interested in learning more about Bethel’s Hendrix Scholarship Competition should contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 731-352-4030 or at admissions@bethelu.edu.      “We’re very proud of the Hendrix Scholarship tradition,” said Mike Parker, Vice President for Development/COO. “It very much represents the level of academic excellence we all strive for here at Bethel, and now we are headed into the next 25 years of this rich and meaningful tradition. I know Mr. Willard Hendrix would be so proud, and we are so grateful to him and his family for his vision and his generosity.” 
  •   LEGACY, Bethel University’s historical character interpretation group celebrated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday with a presentation of his famous Civil Rights address from August 28, 1963. LEGACY presented “I Have a Dream” remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on Wednesday, Jan. 23, and Thursday, Jan. 24. Here, Kardell Ambrose, a sophomore from Millington, Tenn., portrays Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during one of the two performances.
  •   LEGACY, Bethel’s historical character interpretation group, welcomed Douglass Thompson Bates III, an attorney from Centerville, Tenn., as a guest speaker on Thursday, Jan. 17. Bates shared with the group his recipe for becoming successful. Bates also role played with the group and shared his personal experiences that included a visit to Martin Luther King Jr.'s church the Sunday after his assassination.
  •   Prospective traditional undergraduate students were on campus on Thursday, Jan. 17 for Bethel's Winter Preview Day. Students had the opportunity to meet with various departments and to tour campus and get a feel for the school.    Students can also contact the Office of Enrollment Services about the Hendrix Scholarship Competition on Feb. 22 & 23, and an Open House on Saturday, March 16. Prospective students who cannot attend these events are encouraged to contact Enrollment Services at 731-352-4030 or at admissions@bethelu.edu to determine a campus visit that will be convenient to them.
  •   The American Red Cross is proud to partner with Bethel University to raise awareness about a condition that is prominent within the community but rarely spoken about. Sickle Cell Anemia affects more than 80,000 people in the U.S., 98 percent of whom are African American. This blood disorder is an inherited disease that causes red blood cells to form in an abnormal crescent shape, which doesn’t move easily through the blood vessels. When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, blood flow decreases to that part of the body.  Tissue that does not receive normal blood flow eventually gets damaged, causing pain and organ damage.      Lamar Bowen of Bethel University lives with Sickle Cell and says this is an issue the community must address. “I think it is very important to talk about Sickle Cell. We have to educate ourselves about this condition to raise awareness about the importance of donating blood and to help educate future generations,” said Bowen. “There area people out there living with Sickle Cell who are struggling to find the right blood type match. I want the community to know that giving blood could help save a life and prevent someone from having to go through serious pain.”      Bowen is a proud member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. His fraternity brothers are fully supportive of the drive, “We hope this blood drive is a huge success and that we get the most donors are possible to help those in need,” said Bowen.      Patients living with this special condition need frequent transfusions to survive. A single Sickle Cell patient could receive up to 100 pints of blood each year to continue to live with the disease.      Because certain blood types are unique to certain racial or ethnic groups, it is essential that the diversity of the blood donors match the diversity of these patients in need.      Transfusions from blood donors of the same ethnic background are most beneficial because they have less chance of causing complications for the recipient.  * If you have sickle cell disease, you are not eligible to donate blood. * If you have sickle cell trait, you are eligible to donate blood. The American Red Cross is holding the first Sickle Cell blood drive in the Bethel Community on January 23, 2013 from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 a.m. at Bethel University. To make your appointment for this blood drive, call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit www.redcrossblood.org and enter sponsor code: 1158 All presenting donors will be entered to win a $1,000 home improvement gift card and a tablet computer valued at $500!      This special blood drive is part of our Blue Tag initiative. To ensure that your blood donation goes to help a Sickle Cell patient, please identify yourself as African American or Black and allow our blood collection staff to place a blue tag on your blood donation.  The blue tag will notify our processing lab that this blood donation is designated for the Sickle Cell Donor Program.      If your blood is not a match for the Sickle Cell Donor Program, it is stored until it is needed.  If the blood approaches its expiration date and has not been needed by a Sickle Cell patient, it will be used by another patient in need. The American Red Cross strives to ensure every blood donation helps a patient in need. How to Donate Blood: Call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org for more information or to make an appointment. All blood types are needed to ensure the Red Cross maintains an adequate blood supply. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Donors must be in general good health, weigh at least 110 pounds and be at least 17 years old (16 with completed Parental Consent Form). New height and weight restrictions apply to donors 18 and younger.  About the American Red Cross: The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies more than 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.  
  •   Tavares, Fl. –Bethel's Zach Parker and Matthew Roberts brought in 25-1 on day two to dominate competition by a 9-9 margin of victory in the Carhartt College Series South Regional's on the Harris Chain in Tavares, Florida Saturday. The two Bethel Bass Cats had the heaviest bags of the event. Bethel set the all-time one-day and two-day heavyweight records at 29-2 and 54-3 respectively for the Carhartt College Series. The Parker-Roberts day-one effort was the heaviest of the event earning them the award of the Bass Pro Nitro Big Bag of the tournament. Parker commented, "A sharp cold front which came through on day one actually helped us as the front pushed a lot of the fish out of the shallow water to the drop we had picked as fish were all over that area. Bethel also had strong performances from Myles Palmer, Dalton Wilson, and others. The Bass Cats had three teams to qualify for nationals. Bethel Coach Garry Mason was pleased and proud of his entire team. "Bethel is the only college to ever repeat in back to back championships in two different trails. I am so proud of all these young people. Zach and Matthew were just amazing and to break the all-time records is just phenomenal." Contributing to this article: Shaye Baker  
  •   Students returned to classes on Bethel University’s McKenzie campus on Monday, Jan. 7 – the beginning of the school’s spring 2013 traditional semester. Here, traditional undergraduate students got introductions from Dr. Audrey Sistler, Professor of Human Services and Psychology, during the first day of Psychology 330: Research Methods.    Students can still enroll in and register for spring 2013 traditional classes until Friday, Jan. 11 by calling 731-352-4030 or by emailing admissions@bethelu.edu.
  • Chick-fil-A at Bethel University will be open from 11 to 7 during the Christmas break. It will still be closed on Sundays as it always is.

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