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  •   Tickets for Bethel University’s 3rd Annual Twinkle Ball, the ultimate Mommy & Me Christmas extravaganza, go on sale this week beginning Nov. 5. The Twinkle Ball will be on Wednesday, Dec. 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Vera Low Center for Student Enrichment on Bethel’s McKenzie campus.      The Twinkle Ball gives young girls and their mothers (or someone who is motherly to them) the chance to dress up and celebrate the magic of the holiday season in the girliest ways imaginable. This year’s theme is “Twinkle has Frozen” with most activities centered around the “Frozen” movie theme. Some of the planned events include: “Frozen” manicures by the Edge Hair Salon; a make and take “Olaf” character, a make your own “Frozen” popcorn ball, silhouette portrait sittings, a bracelet making station, a Christmas ornament station, a photo booth station and photos made with some surprise guests.      Tickets are $25 for a mother/daughter ticket. Mothers with more than one daughter can purchase additional tickets for $7 each. Tickets can be purchased at the Bethel University Bookstore. But they must be purchased in advance by Monday, Dec. 1. For more information about the Twinkle Ball, call the Bethel Bookstore at 731-352-4094 or Myra Carlock at 731-352-4090.  
  •   Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014 will be a momentous occasion in the history of Bethel University as its Board of Trustees holds an inauguration ceremony for the school’s 40th president, Dr. Walter Butler. Butler officially became President this past June after serving as Interim President since August 2013.      Butler, who holds both a bachelor’s degree and an MBA from Bethel, was recently presented an honorary doctor of humane letters by the school’s trustees. Butler’s Bethel career actually began in 1975 when he began work as an admissions counselor – a position he held for three years until he ran for the Office of Carroll County Trustee and won. He served as Carroll County Trustee for 16 years, being re-elected in 1982, 1986, and 1990. In August of 1994, he ran successfully for the Office of Carroll County Executive (now Carroll County Mayor). Butler served in this capacity until 1996 when Governor Don Sundquist asked him to become Tennessee’s Director of State Parks. As Director of State Parks, Butler oversaw 54 parks, 1,600 employees and a budget of more than $57 million. Governor Sundquist went on to appoint Butler the Deputy Commissioner of Personnel and then as Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Butler then served as Commissioner of Personnel, a position he held to the end of Governor Sundquist’s term in office.      Butler later returned to Bethel as the Director of Business Affairs where he eventually held positions as Executive Vice President for the College of Liberal Arts and as Vice President for the College of Criminal Justice.      University presidential inaugurations are steeped in age−old tradition, and they reflect the history and traditions of higher education which date back to the Middle Ages. An event distinguished by great ceremony‚ the presidential inauguration stands out as a celebratory milestone in a university’s life. Bethel University is one of the oldest universities in the state, and it holds dear its traditions, some of which date back to its founding in 1842.      “We are extremely fortunate to have Walter Butler as President of this university,” said Judge Ben Cantrell, chair of Bethel’s Board of Trustees. “We could have made a nationwide search and still not found a candidate with his combination of knowledge, skill and dedication. He believes in this university, its mission and its people.”       The inauguration ceremony will be held in Crisp Arena in the Vera Low Center for Student Enrichment. It will begin at 11 a.m., and the public is invited to attend.       For more information, contact Myra Carlock at 731-352-4090 or at carlockm@bethelu.edu.    
  •   Bethel University’s Renaissance Program is excited to announce the 2014 schedule for “Christmas with Renaissance.”      “Christmas with Renaissance” is an annual celebration that showcases the talents of the Renaissance Program at Bethel University. This “fun for the whole family” performance will boast a wide variety of genres of music all focused on the Christmas theme. The concert will feature all aspects of Renaissance including the Renaissance Choir, The Renaissance Quartet, Vocal Authority, Renaissance Theatre, The Renaissance Bluegrass Bands, The Renaissance Orchestra and The Renaissance Revolution. Also this year, the group will be joined by special guests “The Little Rebel Singers.”       Performances are November 21, 22 and 23 at the Dickey Fine Arts Building on campus in McKenzie, Tenn. Shows begin at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday with a 2 p.m. Matinee on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children (12 and younger). Tickets can be purchased at the Renaissance Office located at 28 Lee Ave. in McKenzie. The office will be open from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call (731) 352-6980 for more information.       Bethel Faculty, Staff and Students will receive free tickets. Please reserve those tickets in advance by emailing April Dodd, Renaissance Administrative Coordinator, at dodda@bethelu.edu and they will be available for you at will call the night of the performance.   Like in the past, the group anticipates sold out crowds for each performance.  
  •   The Bethel University Renaissance Theatre program is pleased to announce the opening of their next musical theatre production, “Urinetown: The Musical.” This hilariously comedic and somewhat farcical musical tells the tale of an imaginary town that is quickly running out of its most precious natural resource: water.  In an effort to conserve water, citizens are forced to pay to use public restrooms and there is growing discontent as a large corporation has seized control of all the public restrooms, charging high fees to the poor and downtrodden.  One man decides to fight the tyranny of the corporate control and uncover the truth of why and how this town ended up in this condition.  As the story unfolds, we see how desperate people are pushed to desperate measures when faced with horrible circumstances. While the title is extremely obscure and somewhat unsettling, audiences will appreciate the power of the story and how it tackles environmental, political, and social issues.  The show asks some very challenging questions about society and how government or corporations attempt to ‘control’ the public.  Director Brian Hill explained it this way.  “This production takes a more light-hearted approach at tackling serious issues, but at the same time, we get the chance to look inside how people respond when their circumstances around them are dire.  While I hope that there will never be a day when our communities don’t have access to water, we can also see that around the world there are still many people without access to clean drinking water, so maybe this issue is more current than we realize.” With that in mind, the Renaissance Theatre program has partnered with the organization Charity Water to raise money and awareness for impoverished communities around the globe that do not have clean drinking water.  Lauren Lay, a junior, presented the idea to the directors and was excited to help spearhead the project.  “Our goal for this project is to raise at least $1500 towards digging wells in Ethiopia.  We are encouraging our audience, and other local community members to either donate online, or bring cash or spare change to the show and hopefully we will meet that goal!”  You can find information about this project at www.my.charitywater.org/renaissance-theatres-urinetown. The show will open at the Bethel Performing Arts Center at 647 Stonewall on Saturday, November 1st at 7:00 pm with a matinee on Sunday the 2nd at 2:00 pm.  It will also run on November 6-8 at 7:00 pm and 2:00 on November 9th.  Bethel Faculty, Staff, and Students receive free admission. Tickets can be reserved by calling 731-352-6980 or by emailingrenaissance@behtelu.edu .  
  •   Bethel University honored three former athletic greats and two athletic contributors with inductions into the prestigious Bethel Athletic Hall-of-Fame Friday night at the 2014 Alumni Awards and Athletic Hall-of-Fame Dinner which was held in the Board Room at the Vera Low Center for Student Enrichment, Crisp Wing. The 2014 inductees are: Dewey Chism (64) Men’s Basketball Dr. Ernie Owen (64) Men’s Basketball Bruce Herrin (70) Men’s Basketball & Baseball JT & Robye Lindsey -Contributors Prior to this year, seventy three people and one team had been enshrined into the hall. The 2008 soccer team was the first team to be inducted at the 2013 ceremonies. Here is a look at the 2014 Hall-of Fame Class: Bruce Herrin was a two-sport student athlete at Bethel and a very good one in both sports.   Herrin graduated from Somerset High School in Somerset, Kentucky in 1966. After his high school graduation he enrolled in Bethel and played basketball and baseball under Bethel Hall-of-Fame coach Doug Hines. He played both sports at Bethel from 1966-1970 and graduated from Bethel in 1970. He was voted Best Defensive player in 1967. He held the Wildcats best free throw shooting percentage in 1967, 1968 and 1970. The 1970 Wildcat squad captured first place in the 1970 VSAC Western Division. He was named as an Outstanding Athlete in the College Athletics of America in 1969. He had the best ERA of all pitchers on the Wildcat baseball team in 1968.  After graduating from Bethel he coached baseball and taught science in the McKenzie School system from 1970-73. He became a graduate assistant coach in 1974 at Mississippi College in Clinton, Mississippi under new head basketball coach Doug Hines. In 1975 he returned to Bethel as an assistant baseball coach under Coach Lionel Sinn. In 1976 he returned to the McKenzie School system to coach and teach. He was in the system until he retired 27 years later. He impacted hundreds of lives with his dedication and talents he offered to the system, the city of McKenzie and surrounding area.   In November, 1975, Bruce married Donna Barnett. They have two children, Brad Herrin and Holly Herrin Porter. They feel blessed with three grandchildren, Ryleigh Herrin (12), Brycen Herrin (7), and William “Will” Porter (4). Dr. Ernie Owen attended high school at Lone Oak High in Paducah, Kentucky. After graduating from there he attended Paducah Junior College for two years and was named to the All-Regional Tournament team in basketball. He began a very successful basketball career as a student-athlete at Bethel in 1962. He averaged 17.7 points and 7.5 rebounds per game. He scored a career high 31 points against Florence State in 1964 and was voted Most Athletic that same year. He was a Co-Captain both years with the Wildcats. He is a Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Western Kentucky University where he taught for over thirty years. He was a teacher, coach and counselor in every grade from kindergarten through graduate school. He obtained his M.A. in Guidance Counseling from Murray State University and his Ed. D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Florida. He is known for his numerous in-service workshops for teachers, coaches and principals on such topics as motivation, discipline and stress reduction.  He is noted for his teachings at the high school and university levels in the fields of relaxation techniques, mental imagery and yoga to athletics teams.  Dr. Owen has also raised, trained and showed champion, pure –bred Arabian horses for over twenty years. Since his retirement, he has been actively involved in the study of the effects of lifestyle and nutritional choices on mental and physical health, aging and longevity.  Dr. Owen is married to Judy Trevathan Owen and they have a daughter Jill Owen Norris and a granddaughter Dr. Jordan Norris. Ernie Owen has been recognized prior to this year as an Outstanding Alumni of Bethel.  Dewey Chism is a native of Baldwin, Mississippi.  After graduating from high school where he was all-state in basketball and football he enrolled at Northeast Mississippi Junior College in Booneville, Mississippi and was a standout basketball player there for two years. While at Northeast he was seen by Coach Vincent and the rest is part of Bethel history. He attended Bethel and played basketball from 1962 -64. As a forward and guard he was a key member of the Wildcats during his two years at the school. He was also Vice-President of the PE Club while at Bethel. He is a 1964 graduate of Bethel College. After graduating from Bethel he obtained his Master’s degree from Murray State University. He was certified as a Career Level III teacher by the state of Tennessee and was a very popular and respected teacher, coach and mentor in the McKenzie School system. He served the system well teaching mathematics, PE and Driver’s Education. He was also principal of the middle and high schools. He coached football, girls and boys basketball and affected many young people’s lives in a positive and constructive way.  Former McKenzie head football coach and Principal Jerry Escue worked with Dewey for four years. Dewey was on Coach Escue’s football staff. Escue had this to say about Dewey.  “I don’t know of any more loyal and committed person to his fellow workers and students than Dewey Chism. Our first summer in McKenzie we had no lockers for our football team. He worked tirelessly all summer to help build them and never asked or received pay for his work. There are countless other things just like that he was a part of because of his loyalty and dedication. His students loved him and he was a friend to them but they also knew where he would draw the line. He was a consummate professional in all he did. He understood, appreciated and accepted the mission for what it took to serve.”    Prior to joining the McKenzie system he coached and taught at Rosedale High School in Rosedale. Mississippi.  He is a former member of the McKenzie Rotary Club and former deacon at the McKenzie Church of Christ.  Mr. Chism has been married to Keitha Hatley Chism for fifty years and they have two children, Randy and the late Ricky Chism.  They also have two grandchildren, Ashlyn and Caroline Chism. JT and Robye Lindsey have been long-time supporters of Bethel College, Bethel University, and Bethel athletics. JT grew up in Decatur, Alabama and graduated from Pharmacy school from Samford University in 1957. Miss Robye grew up in Brighton, Tennessee. She played high school basketball and collegiate tennis at Erskine College. They married in 1954. They moved to McKenzie in 1958, joined the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, purchased the old Cannon Drugstore in downtown and operated it as Lindsey’s Rexall from that time until it was sold in 1980. It was there the Bethel connection was formed as the ‘old soda fountain” was a major gathering place for Bethel students and faculty. The Lindsey’s became mentors to most all they came in contact with. Lifelong relationships were formed that exists until today. JT and Robye have “adopted” Bethel students and coaches from all sports through the years and have always been passionate supporters at home and on the road.   They have taken students into their home and been stand-in parents for many international students. Their services have been varied. They have greeted and sold tickets for various sporting events. Whether it was old Dishman and Baker Fieldhouse, the old McKenzie High School, the new Dishman and now the new Crisp Arena, the Lindsey’s have always been there. It hasn’t mattered what conference or who they opponent has been, they have always supported their beloved Bethel student athletes. They are the proud parents of sons, Keith and Tim and also seven grandchildren and two great grandchildren.  
  •   Josh Hayes of Milan and Leah Watson of Smyrna were crowned Bethel's Homecoming King and Queen during the halftime of the Homecoming game on Saturday, Oct. 18. Homecoming Court included: Jason Wade of Paris; Katie McGill of Humboldt; Frankie Hewlett of Burlison; Alex Young of Lebanon, Mo.; Ethan Morgan of Winchester; Natalie King of Paducah, Ky.; Tyler Lindsey of Alvaton, Ky.; Adrianne Richard of Camden; Gabrielle Van Dyke of Paris; and Matthew Gainey of Seymour. To cap off the game festivities, Bethel earned its first home win of the year bringing a Homecoming victory with a score of 28-14 over Pikeville (Ky.)
  •   During Bethel's Fall 2014 Hall of Fame and Alumni Dinner on Oct. 17, Rev. Joel Rice (front) and Rev. Billy Belmont (back center) were awarded Bethel University Ambassador Awards and were recognized for integrating Bethel in 1962. With them are Rice’s son, Rev. Dr. Perryn Rice (back left) and Bethel President Walter Butler (back right).
  •   This October, the Great Central U.S. ShakeOut Drill is once again being coordinated by the Central United States Earthquake Consortium (CUSEC). It is our hope that you will join us once again to participate in the upcoming ShakeOut Drill on Thursday, October 16th at 10:16AM. Participation simply requires you to Drop, Cover, and Hold On at 10:16 AM on Thursday, October 16, 2014. The ShakeOut is our opportunity to practice how to protect ourselves, and to become prepared. The goal is to prevent a major earthquake from becoming a catastrophe in the future. Preparation is imperative because you may only have seconds to protect yourself in an actual earthquake.   The State of Tennessee lies in what is known as the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Earthquakes in the central or eastern United States affect larger areas than earthquakes of similar magnitude in the western United States. For example, the San Francisco, California earthquake of 1906 (magnitude 7.8) was felt 350 miles away in the middle of Nevada, whereas the New Madrid earthquake of December 1811 rang church bells in Boston, Massachusetts, 1,000 miles away*. In 1811, the New Madrid Seismic Zone area was far less populated. If an earthquake of the same magnitude were to occur today, the resulting loss of life and damage to our infrastructure and economy would be drastically worse. Many of the structures are especially vulnerable and at risk from the severe ground shaking that would occur during an earthquake. Recognizing these problems, CUSEC and the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency are joining together with other organizations and individuals to take actions that will greatly reduce loss of life and property in the future.  
  • Bethel University’s Academic Theatre will present Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
  • The College of Health Sciences is hosting a bone marrowregistry event on October 18, 2014 in conjunction with the Bethel Homecoming Tailgating Activities in Wildcat Alley. A table will be set up from 10:00-1:30 p.m. 

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